The Perpetual Conflict of Anonimity   July 2015     100 pairs of military boots, 100 pairs of children's shoes, 100 years of conflicts.

Visitors'Comments


"Beautiful and still, yet screaming at me"

"The ghosts of identity - This work stops you in your footsteps. A delicate and strong memorial across countries and time"

"Chilling and very thought provoking"

"By far the most poignant and touching of all the works in this show. Powerfully effective. Many thanks for bringing this to us"

"Disturbing, but brilliantly done"

I was,am, moved. The empty shoes = absence. Thank you for giving them their names"

"Such a beautiful way to depict such tragic losses"

"The shoes are so powerful and so disturbing. Everyone should see them. Heartbreaking. Thank you for such research"

A beautiful, poignant and deeply moving installation! It is heartbreaking and powerful - bringing together 'collateral damage' and combatants through numerous conflicts stripped away and desanitised by the official sterile lexicon and brought it back to painful reality"

"Incredible work, so delicate yet so powerful"

"I am profoundly moved. Your work moves us a step towards peace"

​"Sometimes the simplest statements make the most devastating impact. 'The Perpetual Conflict of Anonimity' is deceptively poignant. Well done"


Each pair of footwear represents a real individual who has died as a direct result of armed conflict during the last 100 years.

 This installation became more strongly personal as it developed. Each name and circumstance brought the individuals into focus for me. 

The records I collected appear individually on each of the two hundred hand-written labels included in the installation.

The most deeply poignant discovery though, was the huge, almost  unimaginable statistical  references which kept presenting themselves.   The thousands, upon    thousands of deaths which have become merely statistics, unrecorded as the individuals that they were in life.

 

Through direct casting from actual boots and shoes I have tried to maintain contact  between the present and the past, using    military boots and children’s shoes to examine personal and public feelings about the effect of war on community, family relationships and memory.

My material choice of translucent tissue paper for the final piece alludes to the transience of memory and the fragility of human life, whether as active participant or innocent    bystander to any act of war.

3D Work

Alexandra Blythe MA Fine Art

Community Artist, Arts Facilitator and Film Maker